Category Archives: Library and Information Profession

Nicky Turner – 2017 winner of the Harry Galloway Prize

This year’s Harry Galloway Prize was awarded to Nicky Turner. Here we read about her dissertation and work on secondary school students’ information skills.

Nicky studied for an MSc in Information Management at UWE Bristol from 2015-16 as a full-time student. Previously, she had been an English teacher for twelve years and was looking for a change of career which still enabled her to use her existing skills. Nicky felt that the course offered a broad and varied introduction to the evolving world of information management and its relevant current digital landscape.

During her studies, Nicky worked as a school librarian which enabled her to closely observe, first hand, the information and digital literacy skills of sixth form students. This led her to research this more thoroughly for her dissertation where she focused specifically on students who were planning to make the transition to higher education, and the role of the school librarian in supporting the teaching and development of these skills.

From her previous teaching experience, Nicky could see that it was clear that secondary students’ information skills were frequently unsophisticated, despite their confidence in using digital technology. Studies conducted by university libraries indicated that undergraduates’ skills of searching, evaluating and referencing information were consistently weak, which was echoed by the findings of her own teacher and student surveys, and observations. Nicky taught a series of lessons to help students improve their competency in these areas and noticed that they found the tasks challenging due to their lack of practice. From here, she went on to consider the obstacles for schools in improving the IDL skills of students and found that resourcing, time pressures and political decisions affecting the curriculum were particular barriers. It was also evident that teachers’ own information skills were largely self-taught and they lacked confidence in teaching them. This led her to explore how the school librarian, in his/her capacity as an information expert, could help to overcome these challenges and play an important role from an early age in supporting curriculum development and the teaching of these skills.

On completion of the course, Nicky accepted a role in the Policy and Strategy Team at UCAS. This role has made use of many of the skills she learned on the course, and she is currently leading on the development of an information flow strategy for the team. She has also been able to take a continued interest in the transition skills of young people entering higher education, through internal presentations about her dissertation topic, and attending events about the value of the EPQ following the recent reforms which have seen the reintroduction of terminally-assessed A levels and GCSEs.

Nicky was delighted when she heard that she had won the Harry Galloway Prize – she had really enjoyed learning so many new skills and knowledge; her dissertation allowed her to really get her teeth into a topic that she cared about, so receiving this award has added an extra shine to her experience.

 

 

 

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CILIP SW Visit to the National Meteorological Library and Archive, Part One

We are delighted to publish the first of two reports about a visit to the Met Office National Meteorological Library & Archive in Exeter on 15th November 2017. The event, organised by CILIP SW Member, Valerie Bearne, inspired two of its attendees, Chris Johns and Susan Lee, to write reports about their experience.

Chris Johns, Systems Librarian, at the Royal Cornwall Hospital describes the day:

“The tour was split into two halves, firstly to the National Meteorological Office Library and then after lunch to the National Meteorological Archive.

Intrigued by the venue and with my lack of knowledge of the functions and resources of the National Meteorological Library and Archive (NMLA) it was an easy decision to sign up to this event.  The opportunity to visit a more exotic corner of our profession with chartership in mind could not be missed.

I shall not describe the history of the Met office, nor the library or archive here. However should you wish to find more out then please visit their website at About Us.

As we met in the foyer the range of people attending from public library to healthcare and further college librarians gave an immediate opportunity to network with colleagues from across the region, each of us looking forward to a tour of this high tech modern building which was officially opened in 2004 when the service relocated from Bracknell to Exeter.

Met Office Library

We were welcomed by Sarah Pankiewicz who is the NMLA manager.

We started with a tour of the library, a brief recent history of the service and an introduction to the current staff. There are currently 6 team members based in the library who are from a range of backgrounds. Sarah is the only professional librarian on the team.

Main duties include:

  • meteorological enquiry service
  • cataloguing books and journals (print and electronic)
  • acquisitions both for library and other members of staff
  • system management and quality control of catalogue records
  • journal management both electronic and print
  • digitisation and quality control
  • sorting , quality control and cataloguing of archive records
  • item loans
  • on-site customer services including online access to e-journals and e-books, the catalogue and digital library & archive

These are all very familiar functions to many sectors, seeing the bound journals reminded me very much of the healthcare sector library I have experience of, but the type and range of some of the materials and information here  is quite specialist. Quite different from much of the information we supply to our users in the healthcare sector.

The service supports the Met Office staff of around 1700-1800 employees the majority of whom are based at the Met Office HQ.

The service is publicly funded and falls within the governance of the Met Office Public Weather Service . The archive service also has a remit under the Public Records Act 1958 to preserve and provide public acccess to the national memory of the weather. The forward plan states that a ‘key aim of the NMLA is to promote awareness of our collections and provide greater access to as wider a user community as possible’ NMLS Policies.

I wonder how many people realise this resource is publicly accessible; I didn’t.

The enquiry service deals with around 150-200 enquiries a month from e-mail, phone calls or in person. There is of course a limit to how long an enquiry should take and how much can be supplied within reasonable resource limits, however the rule is that each enquiry should take no longer than round 30 minutes to meet and should be turned around within 5 days.

Currently the service is undergoing a catalogue migration from EOS (SirsiDynix) to Soutron. EOS was designed for specialist collections. It has enabled the team to catalogue to both library and archive standards within the same system and Soutron will take this a step further enabling the archive records to be displayed in a hierarchical fashion with hyperlinks to to associated records and so providing much easier access to the collections. The new system is due to go live in March 2018.

With the increasing transition from print to online journals and a frozen budget of around £70-80k per annum comes the common issues of subscription management, budget allocation and usage statistics. Subscription management is carried out directly with the publishers, with collections and back files being supplied by Springer, Elsevier and Nature as well as many other key publishers

Online access to e-journals is negotiated on a commercial basis and so copyright restrictions apply accordingly, however due the public access policy of the collection there are personal use clauses that allow content to be supplied to members of the public. Online access may be given either on site or articles downloaded and suplied within copyright restrictions

Scanning of items for document supply to fulfil the requests of staff and the public as well as for storage in the archive has become a large feature of the service offer. Increasingly much of the information and resources are now being ‘born digital’. Though these items still have to be catalogued, managed and archived there are fewer physical resources that require digitization.

The library itself has a very modern, spacious and well lit feel to it, with high ceiling, motion sensored lighting and light coloured decoration and fixtures.

With familiar shelving and reading spaces around the library this offers a generous and welcoming atmosphere for researchers and the public to come and use the resource.

The physical collection contains the usual mix of academic journals, reference texts and reports however this collection also include the Daily Weather Reports back as far as 1860. The collection also has weather reports from many other countries and are often the single repository of many of these items. Requests are sometimes received from the country in which the Daily Weather Reports originated.

 

The physical collection contains the usual mix of academic journals, reference texts and reports however this collection also include the Daily Weather Reports back as far as 1860. The collection also has weather reports from many other countries and are often the single repository of many of these items. Requests are sometimes received from the country in which the Daily Weather Reports originated.

The ongoing digitisation programme ultimately feeds not only the digital archive but also the Met Office ‘super computer’, more on that in a bit. This digitisation supports the drive for preservation and access as well as linking to the government’s ‘transform and efficiency’ drive within the Civil Service.

The Met Office transferred a large collection of historical instruments and artefacts to the Science Museum ahead of the office relocation from Bracknell to Exeter. The library and archive do still retain a small collection of instruments many of which are on display in the library.

We were shown a Campbell-Stokes recorder  as well as the ‘sunshine cards’ that are still in use today. Some of the library team are engaged with sorting and quality controlling a huge collection of Scottish sunshine cards ahead of their transfer to the National Records of Scotand.

There is a world wide engagement in “Data Capture” activities (or for some parts of the world “ data rescue”) where original sourced meteorological records are scanned and the keyed so that the newly digitsed data can be added to exisiting databases including the Met Office observation database known as MIDAS. Increasing the digital record facilitates more accurate analysis and re-analysis of historical weather observations and provides more data for verifcation work . Ultimately this leads to improved accuracy of the forecasting and climate models that run on the Met Ofiice super computer. The archive activiely support these kinds of projects and for records they have already digitised this can help to speed the whole process up.

Sarah indicated that there will probably be a point at which the bulk of the journal print copy additions will cease but that there will still likely be a collection of reference texts, historical records and statistical reports. There is also a display of the history of the Met Office in the library which is an important part of the service’s heritage.

The decision to move from Bracknell to Exeter was made for many reasons, not least the need for a new and expanded site that could support the new ‘super computer’ and it’s power requirement. Of course staff vote favoured Exeter over other proposed locations, but also the restrictions on planning in other sites and the ability to consolidate offices from many locations into one place was another key driver.

The Street

Once the tour of the library had concluded and before lunch in the onsite staff canteen we were granted access to the staff area that members of the public are not given access to. Through a series of swipe access doors and we entered into a vast area that resembled a shopping precinct and which is known as The Street.

The vast atrium incorporated a restaurant, many meeting rooms, offices, access to the Met Office college and a small stream. We were led to a rather insignificant door. Once through that we entered a corridor and were greeted by Peter Johnson (Co-ordinating Installation Design Authority Engineer), an engineer who looks after the ‘super computer’ who took us to a rather noisy room.

This houses some of the cabinets and processors that forms the ‘super computer’ which is currently supplied by Cray . Peter listed some stunning facts about the amazing beast.

The supercomputer consists of three main systems – an identical pair of machines and a single larger system in a new purpose-built data centre nearby. The twin identical machines provide a highly resilient capability for running time-critical operational weather forecasts, whereas the third system provides research, development and collaboration capabilities,

The three new Cray XC40 supercomputers:

  • Are capable of over 14,000 trillion arithmetic operations per second – that’s more than 2 million calculation per second for every man, woman and child on the planet.
  • Contain 2 petabytes of memory enough to hold 200 trillion numbers.
  • Contain a total of 460,000 compute cores. These are faster versions of those found in a typical quad-core laptop.
  • Contain 24 petabytes of storage for saving data – enough to store over 100 years worth of HD movies

This power allows the Met Office to take in 215 billion weather observations from all over the world every day, which it then takes as a starting point for running an atmospheric model containing more than a million lines of code.

More information is here: https://www.metoffice.gov.uk/research/technology/supercomputer

Operations Centre

We left the highly sanitised area of the the computer halls and were taken back into The Street and up stairs to the Operation Centre. Andy Bowden (Operations Centre Manager) gave us a talk on the functions in the operations centre. The open plan office which is staffed 24/7/365 had  a massive wall of TV screens with an array of satellite images and news feeds.

This room houses the Chief Forecaster whose role it is to predict and summarise the conditions for the next 48 hours ongoing. The vast amounts of data is analysed and summarised here.

It was explained that even if a large weather event is forecast it is the potential of the impact that is a primary concern, not necessarily the scale of the conditions.

There were many areas sectioned off, each section the base for different operations teams.

These included:

Flood Forecast Centre –working with the Environment Agency to predict flood and produce warning

Natural Hazard Partnerships – liaising across organisations

Marine Centre – delivering weather and sea condition reports

Aviation Centre – highlighting and coordinating flight plans and informing air traffic control

Space Weather – long range  low probability yet high impact events

Media Centre – produce various weather summaries for TV and media forecasts

Industry and Commercial Support – include supermarkets, energy and surface transport companies

Customer Service Desk – fielding general enquiries

Met Office Archive

Catherine Ross, from the National Meteorological Archive took us on a 5 minute walk over to the building which is jointly shared with the Devon Heritage Centre across the road from the main Met Office site.

The building was developed as a joint venture due to the similarly unique requirements for storing archive records in temperature controlled strong rooms. The move of the Met Office
coincided with Devon Council needing to relocate the local archives at around the same time. The shared resource made financial and environmental sense.

As well as their remit under the Public Weather Service the archive has a statutory obligation to preserve and provide access to their collections under the Public Records Act. The collections are held on behalf of The National Archive (TNA) as a legal “place of deposit” and this status was recently ratified as part of the TNA accreditation which was awarded last year.

As Archivist Catherine’s role includes preserving and providing access to these largely unique collections. Conservation work is a different area of expertise and when materials are identified as requiring conservation work then these will be sent away or handled by the conservation team in Devon Heritage Centre.

Each strong room is temperature controlled, with the corridor leading to each room having a steady temperature. A barrier is created from the corridor temperature entering the room with an automatic air conditioning system that switches on with the opening of the door creating a buffer. This way an average temperature of between 15-18 degrees Celsius are maintained, though this is harder to achieve in the warmer months.

Gradual temperature increases are not such a concern, but any sharp jump in temperature can prove harmful to the items stored. Humidity is kept to around 55-65%. Managing the collection is made particularly difficult as much of the paper has an acid content which hinders preservation.

Photos are prone to cracking and reducing the development of mould or red rot is an ongoing challenge. Vinegar syndrome is a phenomenon that causes old film or acetates to explode, though Catherine reassured us that there were no such items in this archive collection.

A large part of the archive comprises weather observations – largely hand written from climate returns, register and ships logs. There are also numerous charts and trace recordings of observations. You will not find recordings of weather forecasts held here – partly because the copyright for these is held by the broadcasting companies but also because the archive largely focusses on the weather as observed.

We were shown the stacks of weather charts bound in monthly volumes going back as far as the 19th century and each one usually requiring 2 people to lift as they are so large.

Whilst work to digitally capture the original analogue data for transfer to MIDAS (the Met Office observation database), it is vital to preserve the original record as an important aspect of not only historic importance but also for quality control purposes. Mistakes can be made in the data interpretation process so having the original record allows for checking accuracy retrospectively.

The Met Office was founded in 1854 by Rear Admiral Fitzroy, who had had devised a way of forecasting the potential maritime conditions.  After the Royal Charter Storm on the 26th October 1859, which took approximately 800 lives and around 133 ships, Fitzroy established the Storm Warning Service, thought to be the earliest National forecasting service in the world.  One of the artefacts in the archive is the first chart produced by Robert FitzRoy and J H Babington which illustrates the conditions of the night of the Royal Charter Storm.

Other interesting artefacts include early weather observation equipment such as antique barometers, illustrations of frost fayres, a proclamation which has survived from the reign of King Charles II asking for people to undertake a 24hr fast and prayer in an attempt to end a period of heavy rainfall and the Meteorological Office grant of arms which includes an illustration of their official coat of arms. This is topped with a weather vane. The weather vane was the original Met Office logo and was affectionately known as the ‘Chicken on a Stick’.

Copies of the weather charts for the 5th and 6th of June 1944 demonstrated just how much impact an accurate forecast could have. The decision for D-Day was taken with great consideration given to the weather and sea conditions. The weather chart for the 5th June was all important as that was when the decision was made to go ahead with the allied invasion of Europe. Conditions were marginal and the German forecasters did not have such complete data as the allied forces. As a result they had thought the weather would not be suitable for the attack and so were less prepared than they might have been had they seen the same charts as the allied commanders.

The tour ended with a viewing of some rare texts which included the earliest text in the NMA, an illuminated manuscript by Albertus Magnus covering various aspects of Natural History including an early understanding of the nature of the refraction of light, and Admiral Francis Beaufort’s hand written weather diary including the first incarnation of his scale of winds.

This was an extremely informative and interesting day out. Providing insight not only into a fascinating topic which affects us all each day, but also into the similarities and differences our profession throws up in all aspects of its application. A visit is recommended.

Take away points/highlights

It is interesting how similar services are in spite of their specialist nature. We experience many of the  same challenges of resource procurement, electronic access barriers, resource management, staffing levels, proving value through KPI’s, digitisation challenges and service funding pressures. We may learn a lot of new ways of dealing with these pressures with more knowledge sharing.

I was surprised to learn how digitised historical data is being added to the modern forecasting models in order to continuously improve their accuracy. As official data, private collections and donations are added to the collections, alongside the advancements being made in technology, we are still learning a lot from the relatively recent past.

Great collaborative projects such as the joint project between Devon County Council and the Met Office to fulfill a common need with a shared resource like the Archive building are essential. Looking for alternative solutions to problems can bring many opportunities into sight.

Ultimately, weather forecasting is not about ferocity or severity but all about impact!”

 

A visit from the Reading Agency

On Thursday 1st March Exeter College LRCs were pleased to welcome a visit from Genevieve Clarke on behalf of the Reading Agency and the Education and Training Foundation. The main focus of this visit was to gather evidence for case studies supporting the development of reading for pleasure to boost achievement. Exeter College was chosen for its excellent track record in encouraging large numbers of students to enrol for the Reading Ahead challenge which runs annually.

Particular interests were :- how to weave reading into class time, library promotions, and attempts and techniques used  to engage students in reading activities.

Students working with teacher Beth Bramble from the Foundation Studies faculty described how they were gradually becoming more interested in reading after adopting it as a whole class activity. Beth has found it useful to model reading to the whole group and this is followed by 15 minutes during the lesson devoted to quiet individual reading. Students explained how the reading practice was inspiring them to learn more, and to feel more able to articulate their thoughts and feelings. It was widely agreed that quiet reading for pleasure could have a significant impact on mental and emotional health and wellbeing. As one student put it, ‘I wouldn’t know what to say before’.

Teacher Mark Rawlins from the College ESOL team described the impact of the Reading Ahead scheme for his adult students, who are routinely encouraged to explore our collection of abridged readers. Students of all abilities enjoy the scheme and feel a sense of achievement which ranges from progression to higher level courses, academic success and employability, to being able to read a bedtime story for their children. Students in particular who intend to progress to English GCSE courses will need an introduction to 19th century texts and we particularly invite them to access a variety of reading material including popular classics.

Along with academic texts our LRCs stock a wide range of fiction and journals as well as online resources. Some of our discussion centred around the pleasurable and tactile experience of a real book as opposed to the digital medium, and we have made conscious efforts to achieve this feeling of quiet relaxation with our customised Book Nook area. This is now becoming a focal point for our fiction collections and promotions, and is a popular corner for teacher Antonia Clarke’s Literacy Workshop sessions.

We were pleased to show Genevieve our Hele LRC ( one of 7 Learning Resource Centres within the College) which has a diverse student population and a variety of different corners to sit, work and read. As well as the graded readers, fiction and academic texts, it also holds a collection of texts specifically for Foundation Studies which are classified by topic rather than Dewey to aid discovery. Photos showing our proud students receiving their certificates, including meeting our guest author Tony Hawks last year, were also shared along with information about our library promotions and the launch event for Reading Ahead which took place last October.

We were very proud to show off our students and our facilities, and look forward to further successes and reading achievements within our community.

Cathie Strover

Information Service Assistant

AULIC research presentations event

An event showcasing recent research by MSc students and library practitioners from Bath Spa University, University of Bath, University of Bristol and the University of the West of England (UWE).

MSc presentations

Academic Library outreach: a view from the field – Katie Rickard, Bath Spa University

Katie’s background was in widening participation and she was interested in how that would translate to the academic library sector.  Her research focus was to identify forms of public outreach by academic libraries and to develop a toolkit of practice.  Academic library outreach was well documented in literature in North America but under explored in the UK, though there were good examples of public outreach and engagement work (such as The Hive in Worcester and UWE’s open door policy). The research involved semi structured interviews at three AULIC institutions and a UK wide online survey resulting in 34 responses from 32 universities.  Respondents were asked to reflect on their outreach activities in the last year and to describe their ideal outreach plans. The majority were women (72%), most worked part-time on outreach projects, many were subject librarians. There were high levels of unaffiliated visits but scare reference to outreach activities in job descriptions. Outreach mainly related to schools and college visits, including EPQ.

Recommendations for the toolkit of best practice included running events in libraries to create the link between the library and outreach, setting a limit on attendees to avoid overcrowding, and creating a robust portfolio of outreach resources with guidelines, policies and open access resources made available on a bespoke area of the library website. It was recommended that libraries develop a fair and equitable selection procedure and go beyond the EPQ – which is taken by those already intending to go to university and favours high achieving schools – and arrange such activities as author readings and special collections visits not linked to the EPQ. Use of university marketing departments and partnership working via networking events were also recommended, to tap into skills and knowledge of colleagues from other sectors.  To ensure ownership and autonomy an outreach agenda should be embedded within library agendas and included in job descriptions.

Conclusions were that outreach is gaining significance with UK academic libraries but is under acknowledged in literature.  Librarians are keen to do more to connect under-represented groups in HE.  UK university libraries are embracing and promoting the concept of the publicly engaged university, including open doors policies and academic-public library partnerships.

The academic information-seeking behaviours of Law undergraduates: a study at the University of Bristol – Rob Challis, University of Bristol

Rob has worked at the University of Bristol since 2000.  His research interests were information literacy and user experience, particularly in subjects where discovery tools don’t interface with key resources.

For the research ten second and final year law undergraduates participated in ‘think aloud’ exercises (they were given a series of information seeking activities and had to say out loud what they were doing), and in follow-up semi-structured interviews reflecting on how they undertook the activities.  Activities included finding material on reading lists and sourcing material on a topic (which resembled their final year research project). Four types of resources were focused on:

  • Library Search/Primo discovery tool
  • Lexis and Westlaw, key databases for Law (used separately as don’t interface with Library Search)
  • Google for accessing informal resources such as Wikipedia, news, NGOs’ sites
  • People (other students, family, librarians)

Findings indicated that Library Search was generally only used to locate books.  Westlaw and Lexis were the primary sources for ‘authoritative’ material, both known items and in more exploratory research. Participants tended to use either Westlaw or Lexis, for subjective reasons such as familiarity or ‘look and feel’.  Google was used for practical and contextual information in the early, exploratory stages of research. Students were happy to share with their peers generic information such as lecture notes but not more specialised information they’d discovered.

The information strategies of second & third years were enhanced with academic and discipline specific knowledge; when searching for information about a recent act, for example, they would also search for the original bill to increase results.  Students commonly used ‘Satisficing’ behaviour, to achieve an adequate or acceptable level in their research rather than best possible and often favoured convenience over legality, such as with eBooks.

Library research presentations

Open Access Citation Advantage at the University of Bath – Katie Evans, University of Bath

Katie is a Research Analytics Librarian and was interested in whether Open Access (OA) research outputs at the University of Bath had higher citations.  Pure (for Green OA papers) and a JISC spreadsheet with funds data were used and copied into SciVal to match up citations.   Papers from 2010-2015 were examined and 27% of both Green and Gold OA papers were highly cited, compared to a baseline of 18% of all papers.  This identified a correlation between higher citations and open access, but on a smale-scale and not necessarily a cause.  There was however a wide subject mix of papers so it could be surmised that the citation advantage of the OA papers was not coming from a subject advantage and overall it was felt that OA does have an impact on citations.

Education Resource Centre Project – Amy Jackson & Hannah Poore – UWE Bristol

The Library’s Education Resources Collection, a distinct collection of children’s material to support teaching practice, was reviewed and refreshed in 2012 with new resources and shelving, but usage declined by 75% in a four year period.  A further review was undertaken in September 2016, to determine the reasons for the decline and whether the collection was still value for money and meeting the needs of student teachers.  Usage statistics were examined alongside a survey, focus groups and comparison of two comparator institutions (Chester & Derby).  The data had not been analysed and fed back to library managers but reflections were made on what worked well:

  • Good level of engagement by stakeholders with academics encouraging students to complete the survey and participate in the focus group
  • Working with the Library Engagement Coordinator to use student communication channels to publicise the survey and focus group.

What didn’t work well:

Data collection period was informed by the need to move the collection to another part of the library which coincided with student placements.

Independent Learning Environments – Tom Rogers & Hilary Cooksley, University of Bath

An Independent Learning Environments project was conducted in late 2015 on the future of study spaces at the University of Bath.  This involved an audit of existing learning environments and study spaces, collation of LibQUAL feedback, focus groups and a survey. Strategies and ideas from other institutions were looked at via a literature review and practitioner based research and reports.

A report was produced on their findings focusing on five themes:

Types of space – need for a variety of flexible and reconfigurable spaces with an emphasis on social and collaborative space and a trend towards interdisciplinary and hands on space.

Space for researchers – trend towards dedicated PGR space with technology for presentations and information creation, meeting space.  Soft seating and food tolerant space was valued and a greater emphasis on quiet space, distinct from undergraduates and housing relevant staff (research support, OP, metrics librarians).   Good examples include the universities of York, Exeter and Warwick.

Staff & services – including qualified librarians in space is beneficial. There is a trend towards convergence of services.

Technologies – should be student centred, customised and value for money to reflect major changes in learning and access to information.   Learning needs to be experiential (for simulation exercises, problem based activities), embedded, across disciplines, beyond the physical space.  Information skills are for life and part of students’ academic and professional futures.

Aesthetics & design – this needs to communicate what the space is intended to be and give a sense of belonging. A good infrastructure (cleaning, food & drink) is required and a good interaction between different spaces.

Conclusions were that the focus should be on self-directed learning spaces, incorporating flexibility, providing social, collaborative and experiential environments.  Removing print in favour of increased study space is alienating students from resources and librarians; effective marketing strategies are vital.

Forthcoming dissertation research – Melissa Newell, Bath Spa University

Melissa is studying at the University of Sheffield and proposes to do a case study at Bath Spa on effective information literacy and its challenges.  Methods will include interviews, observations, data analysis and a possible questionnaire to AULIC colleagues – watch this space.

CILIP Travelling Librarian Award

Any CILIP library and information professional in the CILIP SW area is warmly encouraged to apply for this year’s Travelling Librarian Award. The award is a joint initiative run by CILIP and the English Speaking Union. It is intended to encourage cultural visits to international counterparts in the predominantly English speaking world.

Guy Daines, Head of Policy at CILIP, informs us that the award is offered as ‘an opportunity to an adventurous UK  library and information professional who is a CILIP personal member to explore a professional  theme or challenge by a study tour of library and related institutions in the USA or a Commonwealth country’.

Last year’s winner Leanne Young of Sunderland University visited six libraries in the higher education sector in the USA.

As Guy says, the winner of the award will enjoy a unique chance to ‘enrich [their] professional knowledge and experience’ in what will be a truly defining moment in a professional career’.

There is a dedicated webpage for the Travelling Library Award which has further details about the award with instructions on how to apply. The deadline for applications is Wednesday 27th April 2017.

Presidential visit to UWE Bristol

Kirsten-Rose Brooks reports on talk by CILIP President, Dawn Finch

On 6th December, CILIP President Dawn Finch visited UWE Bristol to give a talk to students on the MSc Library and Information Management course and library staff. Her subject was ethical principles in LIS (Library Information Science) and codes of professional practice. While regarded by some as old-fashioned and no longer needed, Dawn stressed that library ethics have never been more important, particularly in the so-called ‘post-truth’ world as false information proliferates and concern mounts not only for the public good in general, but also the good reputation of the information profession.

Dawn talked about the problem of inappropriate bias in LIS; while some sectors and organisations cannot avoid a bias, such as the House of Commons Library and the military, an ethical code enables librarians and information professionals to fight against this pressure. She reminded us of the major issue of privacy, since the Investigatory Powers Act 2016 has received Royal Assent and the revamp of data protection laws loom.

After this introduction, we worked through some quick-fire ethical scenarios, identifying whether they involved business ethics, personal morals, ethical codes or a point of law. We were continually reminded that, in providing frontline customer service, librarians have seconds to decide what to do in a given situation. Some were really tricky, and there were some disagreements over courses of action, and Dawn emphasised that good training of staff and users is important to avoid ethical dilemmas or negotiate them appropriately.

Dawn used examples to relate ethics to current events, such as in Ferguson, St. Louis during the riots, where librarian Scott Bonner and his staff kept the library open despite pressure from the local authorities to close, in order to continue providing an information service to the community. Another recent instance was media scrutiny of libraries during the Jo Cox murder case. Questions were asked of the role of local libraries since Thomas Mair visited them to search for controversial material online in the lead-up to his crime. During discussions, Dawn said that library work is potentially a minefield, with several potential obstacles. I was reminded of the e-learning module on ‘Overcoming Bias’ we were recently encouraged to complete at UWE Bristol. In this module we were told that librarians and information professionals should be aware of the need to overcome unconscious bias and provide information and books to all users, regardless of personal beliefs. This did get challenged, however – if a library user asked you for details on constructing weapons, would you give them what they wanted straightaway?

There was an encouraging message at the end: our jobs are more needed than ever, if more difficult. Reliable information must be made available from all sides, with policy documents, ethical principles, and the work of professionals used to fight false information, censorship and violation of privacy.

Dawn herself is a very engaging and funny speaker, and I enjoyed the fast pace of the session; although we were discussing weighty issues, we didn’t get bogged down in too much deep discussion and could cover lots of different points. It was an intriguing session which left attendees with plenty to think about.

Kirsten-Rose Brooks

(Graduate Trainee, UWE Bristol Library Services)

AULIC Conference on Library Design 22/6/16

 

Photo credit: Emilio Nanni via Foter.com / CC BY-ND

The AULIC 2016 Conference was a really enjoyable and interesting day. See details on the AULIC Website here for details of the day (and my notes on the speakers below).

AULIC has a new website/blog here

A part of the day was the display of posters from library staff including the visit I made to the McClay Library, Belfast, see Library Design- On Different Budgets:)

See details and all the posters on the AULIC blog

Here are my notes from the AULIC Conference (see here for programme). Apologies to the speakers for any mistakes.

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